A Letter From the Team

Hello world!

Wisebooks team here; we wanted to say that we’ve loved meeting you, dropping books in your inbox, and making “To Read” book lists impossibly long. We’ve gotten some requests for you to meet us too so here we are, and of course, some of the books that have helped shape us.

We’re a team of two and we pretty much spend all of our time together talking about interesting things so we decided to do something interesting instead. We focussed that energy into one problem: there are so many books and so little time (not a bad problem to have tbh).

Everytime we finish a book, there’s a list of 100+ books in some note-taking app (jk the best note-taking app ever, OneNote) on our computers and phones. “Which one should I pick up next??!!!” is the question we want to answer and that’s where Wisebooks comes in. We want to take care of what book you’ll read next.

Meet Jenny

I'm really into learning and about tech and building products. I've been learning how to code over the years, and I love learning about anything machine learning or blockchain-related.

Here are my most recommended books:

Meet Christine

I was really into politics for most of 2017 and 2018 so I'm really familiar with select political situations around the world, mostly in the East (think Ukraine, Myanmar, North Korea, etc.). In 2019, I'm probably going to focus on learning some data science stuff, but also continuing to dabble in my politics addiction from 2018.

Here are the books I recommend. Note: these are not the best books, the best stories, but the important ones that have made me think differently over the years.

  • How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie
    This wasn’t the most riveting book in its writing but it was really important to me in a certain time in my life. I love being around people but in the early years of university, making new friends made me nervous so I just excused that as introversion for the longest time. This book gave me tactics that I could use IRL to get over myself, and took on a whole new perspective to meeting people. Forget introversion/extroversion now, there’s just interesting people and interesting stories all around us.
  • 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss
    This was a game changer in perspective. Up until this book, I was picturing life in its default setting: 9-5 workday, retire at 60ish years old, go fishing or lie on a beach or something. This book was something that I had never even thought of dreaming of - it made me think: so if this is real, what else is there?
  • Ayn Rand and the World She made by Hellen Keller
    I heard her being mentioned all the time in the news, among my friends, saw her on a lot of book lists so when I came across this book in the library, I took it home with me. It was a biography, so kind of like an observation of her beliefs but it was a door to the rest of her philosophies that I constantly think about today. She was by no means a perfect woman, but her story is worth reading on its own and is important as a backdrop to our behaviours in the western world, today.
  • The Course of Love by Alain de Botton
    I heard her being mentioned all the time in the news, among my friends, saw her on a lot of book lists so when I came across this book in the library, I took it home with me. It was a biography, so kind of like an observation of her beliefs but it was a door to the rest of her philosophies that I constantly think about today. She was by no means a perfect woman, but her story is worth reading on its own and is important as a backdrop to our behaviours in the western world, today.